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ENDANGERED PLANT SPECIES

Hibiscus arnottianus

Our new address

Center for Plant Conservation National Headquarters

15600 San Pasqual Valley Rd.

Escondido, CA 92027-7000

email: cpc@sandiegozoo.org

phone: (760) 796-5686

plants in peril

CPC's National Collection of Endangered Plants is composed of the most imperiled plants in the country. An important conservation resource, the Collection is a backup in case a species becomes extinct or no longer reproduces in the wild. Live plant material is collected from nature under controlled conditions and then carefully maintained as seed, rooted cuttings or mature plants.

  • LOTUS ARGOPHYLLUS ADSURGENS

    San Clemente Island Bird's-foot-trefoil

    A shrubby perennial, endemic to San Clemente Island, Channel Islands, California. The Island's recent history of intense grazing has eliminated much of the natural vegetation. Currently, Lotus argophyllus var. adsurgens is known from three sites on the island that support less than 100 individuals and is listed as state endangered.

  • MIRABILIS MACFARLANEI

    MacFarlane's four-o'clock

    This showy plant is quite something if you encounter it in the dry areas of Eastern Oregon and Western Idaho. The protection of Mirabilis macfarlanei is especially important because it is host to a rare moth whose larvae only feeds on the leaves and flowers of this plant.

  • LESQUERELLA STONENSIS

    Glade Cress, Stones River bladderpod

    This rare annual requires habitat disturbance in order to complete its life-cycle. Historically, the floodplain habitat it was found in was maintained by regular flooding, which removed competitive perennial grasses and woody plants. With alterations to the waterways where this species occurs, flooding no longer maintains the habitat this plant needs.

  • HIBISCUS BRACKENRIDGEI MOKULEIANUS

    Ma'o Hau Hele

    Hibiscus brackenridgei is Hawai`i's State flower and a member of the mallow family (Malvaceae). They are found on the island of O`ahu scattered in the Waianae Mountains in lowland dry to mesic forest and shrubland. Hibiscus brackenridgei ssp. Mokuleianus is currently known only from 5 populations with a total of 100-300 plants.

  • ECHINOCEREUS TRIGLOCHIDIATUS var. ARIZONICUS

    Ariona Hedgehog Cactus

    The immediate threat to this taxon is copper mining. Because the process of mining copper requires large amounts of water, dredging of the nearby Pinto Creek has begun. Other threats include the widening of Highway 60, and illegal collection, especially from the type location.

  • UPHEA ASPERA

    Chapman's waxweed

    This species is found only in three counties in the Florida Panhandle. Of these populations, few are protected and many are threatened by encroaching development.

  • RHODODENDRON PRUNIFOLIUM

    Plumleaf azalea

    R. prunifolium is in danger of extinction, as few new seedlings are found in the natural habitats. Due to erosion after logging, many of the sites suitable for R. prunifolium have vanished. It is also under threat of over-collection.

  • BOLTONIA DECURRENS

    Claspingleaf doll's daisy

    Endemic to Illinois and central eastern Missouri, Boltonia decurrens is one of the rarest native species in this region. In fact, until two Missouri Botanical Garden botanists rediscovered it north of St. Louis in 1986, the Decurrent false aster was thought to have been extirpated from Missouri. /p>

  • AMARANTHUS PUMILUS

    Seabeach amaranth, Seabeach pigweed

    The Seabeach amaranth is endemic to the Atlantic coastal plain beaches, where it is currently found in Maryland, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, and South Carolina. It historically occurred in nine states, but is now extirpated from the states of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Delaware, Virginia, and Connecticut. The primary reason for this species decline, and a continual threat to the survival of this species, is shoreline development.

  • LEIOPHYLLUM BUXIFOLIUM

    Sandmyrtle

    This species is found in three disjunct locations in the United States: the New Jersey Pine Barrens, the Coastal Plain of North and South Carolina, and the southeastern Blue Ridge Province. Excessive recreational development of vulnerable coastal areas, road construction, human trampling, shoreline erosion, and invasive species have all threaten this plant.

  • CALLIRHOE SCABRIUSCULA

    Texas poppy-mallow

    Texas Poppy Mallow is a perennial herb about 18 inches high with beautiful wine-purple, cup-shaped flowers. Threats include habitat loss due to farming, pasture planting, sand mining, and urban development. Because the flowers of this species are so beautiful, it is also susceptible to flower-picking, which is detrimental to the remaining populations because it inhibits seed production in populations.

  • ARCTOSTAPHYLOS HOOKERI RAVENII

    Raven's Manzanita

    Raven's manzanita is a low-growing evergreen shrub with urn-shaped white to pink flowers. There is one naturally occurring plant left in its native habitat, located on a slope facing the Pacific Ocean in the San Francisco Presidio.

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Astragalus bibullatus

Participating Institutions

CPC is a network of more than 40 Participating Institutions. These botanical gardens and arboreta from around the country are working to save plant diversity for future generations.